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their christian religion, others followed their muslim religion, and others their african superstitions. for me, this went to the heart of why the book was inevitable, or why, for me, i was engaged this this discourse all my life. it's very strange. i found it very interesting today, close to 80, i should actually exist in an environment in which for admitting what i believe or for believing what i do not believe to be considered of what i call terminal censorship. now, go back to the history, and i don't mean just me personally. i'm talking about the society in which i live, in which i was raised, the history of my people as i now write in the book, when the european explorers, of course, always quickly followed by religious storm troopers, the missionaries came to africa on the mission of conversion, they had a very serious problem, and that was they could not find satan. they couldn't find the denver. now, if you want to convert people, you have to persuade them that they -- that their soul is in dire danger, that they are headed for the ultimate bonfire on the other side of existence. from
made the masters work on religion and i looked at traditional societies. what lessons did you learn about the role of spirituality in the societies we might be missing? >> religion has different functions in traditional societies. from the function that it functions that it has in modern society. traditional societies use religion a lot more explanation, now science provided the explanations of why there's tides and why the sun seems to go across the sky. so there's a function of religion that has become lost with time. religion still has its function of offering comfort, of helping deal with anxiety. religion used to have a function of teaching us to obey the king or obey the president. the reasons that we obey the president today are not because of religion but because of the rule of law. >> interesting. professor jared diamond, thank you so much for all of that. >> you are welcome. >>> and up next, coughing, sneezing and wheezing. the flu outbreak infecting the nation. >> excuse me. >> how facebook -- well timed there, s.e. facebook helping some fight back. we'll explain it next.
time can be spent on things like religion and nationalism. they say the move is a step backward. we have a report from jakarta. >> learning about the motion. it is a prime exercised for children around the world. these children may lose out on some experiments of the government goes ahead with taking a science out of the curriculum. >> science is cool. lots of beautiful, objects can be made through science. when i grow up, i want to be a professor in biotechnology. >> the education ministry says there too overburdened for such causes and they want schools to focus mainly on religion, nationalism, the indonesian language, and math. that would mean the end of signs causes so they could learn about their country's frequent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. >> they are the right age to learn. they are ready to learn the basic concepts of science. what about their future? >> fascinated to listen to listen to the explanation about the many volcanoes. science is important to learn the way of thinking. they say it is necessary for them to be able to compete internationally. indonesia's's
or other with the issue of religion in human life, in politics, and in social life. this is including a book on the difficulty journalists frequently have in properly understanding religion as a motive in events, and the book, itself, is called "blind spot" don't together with roberta, and my colleague, who is here today, paul marshall, published by oxford press and won several literary prizes. it's also included work on a book entitled a table in the presence which was written by lieutenant commander kerry cash which concerns his experiences as a chaplain in combat in iraq. another portion of her work, also within the general area of religion, has focused on the fate of christians around the world, and in particular, their prevails in recent years. this included the award winning "their blood cries out," also co-authoredded with paul marshall, and "eyewitness to a broken world," and cox is a distinguished member of the house of lords, famous as a campaigner for human rights and for christian rights. there will also be out fairly soon another book called "persecuted: the global assaul
. my question is on religion. how big of a role does religion play in the overall aspect of terrorism. how big of a r ole has it played in the u.s.'s policy on counterterrorism? >>the question is what is the role of religion either from the terrorist perspective or the combating counterterrorism perspective. from the terrorist perspective what we have mostly found is that adherence from al qaeda broadly misinterpreted and taken extremist views and perverted islam as a religion to be able to coerce and otherwise control their followers in doing things that are very much what the tenants of islam would say. we quoted a scholar and others that talked about the prohibition of killing innocent civilians. when they talk about the majority of people being killed by al qaeda are muslims contradicted the religion of islam and pointed out they were violating the tenet. so in general, helping to highlight the perversion of the religion in terms of the information we are doing has been helpful and that is what was done with the deadly vanguards report. it identified the problems that al qaeda wa
humans? our modern human ancestors practiced ritual and religion. similar evidence for neanderthals has been elusive. then a team of archaeologists made an intriguing discovery in southern spain. their finds hint at the existence of a neanderthal ritual. inside this cave, a team led by michael walker excavated a deep shaft in which they found more than 300 bones from around ten neanderthals buried by rockfalls from the unstable ceiling. three of the neanderthals stood out. walker thinks they weren't necessarily the victims of a rockfall. if there are rocks falling on you from a natural rockfall, it would be very strange to find nobody trying to escape and one of them with the hands close to the head in almost sleeping position. narrator: although the bones of this young female are fused to the limestone rock and are hard to see, michael walker thinks her body may have been carefully arranged in a fetal position. if he's right, this was no rockfall. around 50,000 years ago, someone had intentionally buried her piling stones to protect her body. and this cave had yet mor
its own religion and incompatible view of the other will have to put up with one another and find ways to work together. with apple and google, we compete in the mobile world, but we are also search partners. >> there are others who are not members of the gang of four. >> there are many potential candidates. twitter is 1. even netflix, which i mentioned. and of course microsoft is absent in my calculation, although they certainly wish that they were. [laughter] >> we have some very good questions from the floor that relate to some of this. one question is "hall will scrutiny over the use of user data affect business strategies ?" >> what happens with all of these companies that collect a lot of data, each of them has different views -- rules. their behavior will largely be controlled by the european privacy laws. there's something called the european data protectorate, which is all about what you do with this data. and old simile, the street solution is going to say the data is owned by the person, not the company, or at least not to be used without that person's permission. anonymous
your language and your religion, we will do it. but at the same time we're going to insist on our own identity as a mandate people. so you could say that there after the identity grew as a counterpoint to this idea that they should be, civilized highest christians. now, all of these tensions were on display because once the supreme court ruled in their favor, and said they could go home, well, the supreme court also ruled the united states government had no responsibility to pay for their going home so how were they going to get home? well, ma for the longest time people believed that some wealthy abolitionists would pay for this, but, in fact, what happened was the abolitionists with the cooperation of the amistad africans organize a big tour up and down the eastern seaboard in which the amistad africans would go and speak and perform, perform their knowledge of christianity, performed their knowledge of english, performed their civilization. and at the same time, they would insist on singing their native african songs. the african side was always there. and here's the wildest part o
governments. it does not happen that way. culture, tradition, religion, ethnic, are all part of that. i talked about alliances. that is why alliances are important. you work within those systems. to effect change and influence change. there are some things going on in the world today that are disgusting, that are despicable, that we hate. but we have limitations as to what we can do to change that. we should always be about helping the people who want to change it. we have limitations. and great powers run into very difficult times when they do not recognize that they too have limitations to their power. all individuals have limitations. nations must be wise enough to understand this. host: as senator chuck hagel, in his speech, and two years ago -- as you hear the words he talks about the limits of power. that echoed what the president said that in 2008 when he was running for the white house. guest: i think that is right. i think one of the conditions that president obama and his team -- a lot of demands and expectations of rumba world and a lot of challenges. america's role is not just to k
, in mythical narrative's, whether it is creationism, or the fact that muslims are a satanic religion. you cannot rationally argue with people who think the earth was created 6000 years ago and adam-and-eve used to ride on the backs of dinosaurs. the only thing you can do is reintegrate them into the economy. that is what frightens me. when you fall to that level of desperation, and this is exactly what tore apart yugoslavia with these ethnic, nationalist identities. there becomes an inability to communicate. a year ago we had several hundred white guys dressed in confederate uniforms margin to montgomery. half of that city is black. to carry out a re-enactment of the inauguration of jefferson davis. it cannot carry out a dialogue. that is what frightens me. we have powerful movements that celebrate the gun culture, the language of violence, that demonize the marginal and the week, whether it is african-americans, homosexuals, women, liberals. i see that breakdown occurring because of the economic disintegration, and having lived through it in places like yugoslavia, the rational argument
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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